The Fight for the Toxic Exposure Bill

Categories: History, News, Public Service Announcement, Remembrance, Survival, The Next Mission

It is estimated that approximately 3.5 Million troops may have encountered some sort of toxic exposure while in service after 9/11. Most of this was due to “burn pits” being used all over Iraq and Afghanistan. A “burn pit” was a designated area where items meant for disposal were set on fire. The items generally burned included trash, water bottles, batteries, jet fuel, human waste, and sometimes even human remains! There were HUNDREDS of toxic chemicals being released into the air right next to where our troops lived. The largest being an estimated 10 acres (around 3 city blocks) at Balad Air Base in Iraq. Many of our troops became gravely ill, developed cancer and even died as a result.

Burn Pits 360 has been campaigning for Veterans impacted by this for over 10 years. It has been a long struggle, but they are gaining momentum. Dr. Raul Ruiz, a Congressman from California, has introduced several pieces of bipartisan legislation on behalf of Burn Pits 360. On December 23rd 2019, President Trump signed into law two pieces of legislation that, according to the Congressman, will

  1. Require the Department of Defense to submit an implementation plan to Congress to phase out the use of burn pits.
  2. Require the Department of Defense to compile a detailed list of all locations where the military used toxic burn pits.

His official government site also states the following:

“During the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, burn pits were used as a primary method to dispose of waste and garbage generated on American military bases. Because items were indiscriminately burned, the burn pits released an array of pollutants, including particulate matter and known carcinogens. Within months or years after returning from deployment, young servicemembers and veterans exposed to burn pits are suffering from pulmonary issues, insomnia, cancer, and rare illnesses.

Independent researchers and scientists, many of them former Veterans Affairs physicians, have conducted studies that found high diagnosis rates of pulmonary diseases on veterans exposed to burn pits.”

Despite this, the Department of Defense has refused to take accountability. “They are more focused on trying to debunk the link between toxic exposure and illness than help our Veterans,” says Jon Stewart, former host of the Daily Show and advocate for the issue. Mr. Stewart championed the 9/11 First Responders Act that provided compensation and health care to those who were exposed to toxic elements during the attack.

In a recent meeting on Capitol Hill, Jon Stewart proclaimed to a room filled with politicians and staff members: “You already have the data! People were exposed to most of the same things in 9/11; we can’t wait for a 20 year study while Veterans are dying!”

A bipartisan group of Veteran Service Organizations, Politicians, and concerned Veterans met with Jon Stewart on January 17 to discuss a new bill set to be proposed in the upcoming months by Senator Gillibrand of New York. This Toxic Exposure Bill would provide health care for those exposed, but there will be challenges.

One of the obstacles the Veterans present identified was ensuring the verbiage of the Bill would include those that were not in areas that rated hazardous duty pay, but still had burn pits. Secondly, to include those who were in theater less than 30-90 consecutive or even non-consecutive days. This is important because typically the 30-90 day mark is when most deployed will receive their campaign medal or Sea Service deployment ribbon. These criteria can sometimes be waived, but if you were injured prior to that mark or had a job that required short rotations (Special Forces being a prime example), you may have been left out. This is why Veterans need to be included in legislation.

Tim Jensen, CSO and Co-owner of Grunt Style, vowed to unleash a relentless campaign in support of the Bill when the time came to act. “We will mobilize the Veteran community to contact their representatives and make our voices heard,” Jensen said during his presentation to the task group.

Staffers took the revisions of the draft Bill to edit and the task group will reconvene to finalize the proposal. “Congress can be an absolute shit show,” Jon Stewart said “but we will do our best to make sure these Veterans are not abandoned.”

Members of the Vietnams Veterans of America were also present. “This is a lot like agent orange,” a statement mentioned throughout the day. Agent Orange was a powerful herbicide that impacted a large number of Vietnam Veterans, in much the same way, causing a multitude of illnesses.

Co-founder of Burn Pits 360, Rosie Torres, said she has experienced a lot of denial and lack of accountability by the DoD. Rosie’s husband, LeRoy Torres, deployed overseas as military and as a contractor where he was exposed to toxic inhalants. Rosie has attended the Burn Pit symposiums. Attendance to these events are closely guarded and often time focus more on denying presumptive accountability to illness that can’t always be explicitly linked to one cause but have been known to be a result of. Confusing right?

So imagine you get sick after spending 9 months living next to a burn pit and the VA says “Well there are a lot of things that cause cancer and we can’t definitively say it was the burn pits exclusively, claim denied.” You reply that the burn pits release agents that are known to cause that cancer, but before you finish they are out the door. This is what Veterans have been dealing with for over a decade.

It is inherently important for everyone of us to call our representatives, write them letters and emails to declare that we demand they provide our service members with the care they deserve after defending our country. This is not about party or affiliation, this is about taking care of the most vulnerable among us, the sick, dying and those unaware something is lurking inside of them.

Burn Pits 360 maintains a separate burn pit registry from the VA and provides limited resources for those affected. Please look for them on social media and sign up for the email list. Stay tuned as this situation continues to develop, we are all in this together.  We also wrote a previous article, found here.

Editor’s Note: While the story mentions certain Senators by name, we did not mention their political affiliation specifically because it does not matter which side they are for.  This campaign is aimed at the people in congress who will listen and help become a voice for the cause.  We hope to get all sides speaking about this topic and involved with the movement happening to create change.

Know what we're sayin fam?

Average rating 4.9 / 5. Vote count: 27

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.

4+
4+

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

3 thoughts on “The Fight for the Toxic Exposure Bill

  1. I am. Veteran and we own a B&B in NJ and in the last year we have had a recent increase of young 30’s something soldiers staying that are suffering from the effects of the burn pits. It is heartbreaking to sit across from someone who has served their country suffering from a disease some already at 100% disability others just learning about what they have to fight ahead. We have to help them.

    1+
  2. So it seems to me that these two bills HR 4574 and S 2950 should have some collaboration to advance this legislation forward. I forwarded same to all my Congressional Senate contacts. There should be no excuse why not. Egos can sometimes get in the way but we all have to remember why we advocate. For our veterans. No excuses.
    🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸⚓️🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸⚓️🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸
    God bless the USA.

    Hi Josh,

    Thanks for reaching out. I’m happy to take a look at the language and see if this is something Sen. Sullivan can support. I’ve worked with Ivelisse in Rep. Ruiz’s office before and I’ll be sure to follow up if we have any questions. I also wanted to bring to your attention to S. 2950, a bill on burn pit exposure that we are also currently driving in the Senate. Additional information can be found attached.

    Thanks for your service,

    Liz

    Liz Banicki
    Legislative Assistant

    OFFICE OF SENATOR DAN SULLIVAN (AK)
    302 Hart Senate Office Building | Washington, DC 20510

    phone: 202.224.3004

    1+