Was It Even That Great of A Treaty

We know it was a hallmark victory of peaceful negotiation during the Cold War. “Look, everyone, these two guys who really want to f*** each other up are playing nice, maybe we should all be better humans too!” Really, it was a good idea then, but we all know how the road to hell is paved with good intentions and all that horseshit right? It’s important that you know that phrase and what it means going forward.

While the initial motivations behind the treaty will never be fully known on either side, due to posturing and the ever-changing whims of politicians, but as it draws to a close, can we really say that it was ever really effective? Did it not cripple one side while emboldening another?

“In the INF Treaty, the United States and Soviet Union agreed that they would ban all land-based ballistic and cruise missiles with ranges between 500 and 5,500 kilometers. The ban would apply to missiles with nuclear or conventional warheads, but would not apply to sea-based or air-delivered missiles.” (click for source)

The fall of the Soviet Union provided hope for many that the saber rattling and ever-present danger of a world kept safe only through the Mutual Assured Destruction Doctrine would be a tiny blip in the history of the modern world. This obviously would not be so.

From 2014 to 2018, the U.S. State Department found that Russia, despite not being the Soviet Union anymore..(cough Soviet Union Lite cough) doesn’t really give a flying shit about adhering to the treaty via multiple battalions deployed with a missile that is in direct violation of the INF treaty. (Same source, but you can click again page 2 second paragraph).

So let’s be honest with ourselves and drop our f***ing egos. Was it really a great f***ing treaty to begin with? No. Because Russia, as it is now or as it was before, never intended on fulfilling it’s side of the treaty and laughed at us behind the closed doors of the Kremlin.

F***ing assholes.

 

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